OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PENNSYLVANIA ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY BANKERS

Pub. 2 2020 | Issue 8

hometown-champions

Hometown Champions

Somerset Trust Company

Communities across Pennsylvania are growing and thriving because their community banks care. The service and commitment demonstrated by community bank employees keeps customers faithful, and their sincerity keeps others hopeful. It is because of these employees that communities across the Commonwealth are thriving and becoming better places to live and work.

When it comes to community banking in Pennsylvania, the uniqueness, talents and attributes of the 14,000 individual community bank employees combine to make the entire industry greater than the sum of its parts.

As we travel across Pennsylvania, we meet community bank employees from many different backgrounds. Some are new to the industry, others have worked their entire careers in it. No matter how long these employees have been involved in banking, they all share a common thread — a love for their community. They truly are the ones responsible for bettering their hometowns.

As part of an ongoing series, each month we will be featuring interviews with these community bank employees, these “Hometown Champions.” Through these interviews, we hope to gain some insight into what makes the community banking industry great in Pennsylvania.

This month, we chat with the hometown champions from Somerset Trust Company, a bank with an independent community vision that still exists today. Now under the leadership and guidance of the fifth generation of the Scull family, the bank has endeavored to enhance the traditional qualities of community banking by effectively using technology to support excellent service to customers.

Andrea-Weimer

Andrea Weimer

Andrea Weimer
BSA Officer

PACB: How did you get into community banking?

ANDREA: If you had asked me at a younger age what I wanted to be when I grew up, the answer would have been a figure skater like Michelle Kwan or a marine biologist working with dolphins — not a banker. My path to community banking was not a planned one; it’s more like one of those life-just-happens things. I started at Somerset Trust Company in May of 2010 as a summer intern before my senior year of college; I returned to the bank to work over Christmas break for a few weeks and then again after graduation as I searched for my “career job.” My college degree is in Accounting, with a minor in Business Management. After applying for multiple accounting positions in the Pittsburgh area and hearing no responses except that one company had decided to terminate the position and not hire, I decided to stay in Somerset. I was able to move into STC’s internal audit department and learn about most of the different areas of banking while in this role. At the beginning of 2015, I was asked to join the bank’s Bank Secrecy Act department as an analyst. This checked the mathematical and analytical boxes for me, as well as being interesting. I am currently the BSA Officer for STC; the majority of my time in community banking has been in a compliance-related position.

PACB: What is the most rewarding aspect of working in community banking?

ANDREA: Although I don’t work on the front line here at the bank, I believe what my department does is very important in the community at large. Financial crimes are an issue everywhere. Helping to keep our community members educated and protected from illicit activity and fraud is an ongoing effort but is also rewarding at times.

PACB: People always want a definition of “community bank,” what’s yours?

ANDREA: I think that Somerset Trust embodies the true meaning of “community bank.” It’s not just a word on our advertisements. We strive to make each community we enter a better place by contributing to local festivals, volunteer fire departments, other non-profits, etc.

PACB: Tell us something about yourself that most people don’t know.

ANDREA: I really enjoy DIY projects, especially those you can do around your home cost-effectively to change the look and feel of a space. Also, I’ve gone skydiving.

PACB: What is the fifth picture in your camera roll on your phone, and can you please share the story behind it?

ANDREA: The fifth picture on my camera roll is of our dog, Jake. He is enjoying the snow! We love taking him on hikes at local state parks or around our families’ farms.

Adam-Kopp

Adam Kopp

Adam Kopp
Marketing Assistant

PACB: How did you get into community banking?

ADAM: I got engaged to my beautiful wife, Ashley, and I moved to the area she called home. While I was job searching, someone recommended I look into Somerset Trust Company.

PACB: What is the most rewarding aspect of working in a community bank?

ADAM: You get to see the fruits of your labors reflected in your community, in your customers, and in your fellow employees.

PACB: People always want a definition of “community bank”, what’s yours?

ADAM: It is right in the name — “community” first, “bank” second. People often forget that banks were originally established to help the communities they were in; we need to get back to that way of thinking.

PACB: Tell us something about yourself that people do not know.

ADAM: I like to play acoustic and electric guitar!

PACB: What is the 5th picture in your camera roll?

ADAM: The fifth picture in my camera roll is a picture of my wife, Ashley; our cat, Charlie; and our dog, Callie. When we both have a day off, we enjoy spending time downstairs next to the warm woodstove watching TV with our pets.

Dixie-Kelly

Dixie Kelly

Dixie Kelly
Customer Service Representative

PACB: How did you get into community banking?

DIXIE: I am a longtime employee of Somerset Trust Company with over 30 years of service, and I anticipate retirement by the end of this year. My previous employer of nine years offered the American Institute of Banking classes in the Somerset area. One of my teachers was the Human Resource Director of Somerset Trust Company. In the fall of 1988, she called and said there were five positions open at STC and she thought the customer service position would be a good fit for me. I initially turned it down due to my children being very small. She called me back in the spring of 1989 and, with great anticipation, I accepted the position as a customer service representative. By far, this was the best decision I made for my banking career. I’ve shadowed different jobs over the years but found this position was and still is the perfect fit for me.

PACB: What is the most rewarding aspect of working in community banking?

DIXIE: As a community bank, one of the most rewarding aspects is being able to give the utmost attention to your customers with the freedom to make certain judicious decisions.

PACB: People always want a definition of
“community bank,” what’s yours?

DIXIE: A community bank is an independently owned bank that treats and serves its customers like family. They are very generous in putting money back into the community they serve.

PACB: Tell us something about yourself that most people don’t know.

DIXIE: I was raised in a Christian home. My father was a great example for us three girls.

PACB: What is the 5th picture in your camera roll on your phone, and can you please share the story behind it?

DIXIE: he fifth picture in my gallery is a picture of myself and a very handsome man whom I met four months ago. I am a widow and he is a widower. We both lost our spouses in the last two years, after over 40 years of marriage. We found each other on a dating website. My husband had just retired from the Department of Corrections with 25 years of service. On the first day of the hunting season, he passed away with a massive heart attack. The widower’s wife also had a heart attack unexpectedly. With that said, we’re trusting the Lord to guide us through this journey. If we could give any words of advice, it would be treasure your family and friends every single day, and put Christ first in your life.

(I’d be happy to share this picture. We went for a walk on the Allegheny Bike Trail in Somerset County near Rockwood where I live).

By Somerset Trust Company

This story appears in 2020 Issue 7 of the Hometown Banker Magazine.

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